Looking to introduce a new language during your home days? Or perhaps you’re looking for ways to support your child’s language development skills? Here’s one way Jill, Spanish Teacher at Hilltop, uses colors and emotions to support children’s language acquisition in the classroom and everyday life!

The language we explore during class comes from many places: our routines, songs, books, children’s play etc. I also identify and create a plan for us to focus on particular vocabulary areas. I may choose certain vocabulary in order to support children’s play, incorporate upcoming curriculum, or to open up new ideas or perspectives.

The color vocabulary we have been working with lately is an example of this kind of teacher-led curriculum. I have found that colors are a good general topic that can get kids communicating in the target language, whether they are new to foreign language learning or already have some knowledge and experience. It also helps that there are endless interesting and fun ways to explore color! Our explorations so far have included group art and color identifying group games, color mixing, and pipette experiments, and one large multi-colored parachute.

Feeling words started popping up during some of our color games and started practicing colors in happy, sad, and surprised voices. During our adventures with the parachute, kids ended up taking turns controlling its movement with some tempo vocabulary. Check out below vocabulary you could try using with your child at home. Hasta pronto!

 

 

El vocabulario del color y emociones:

paracaídas – parachute
arriba – up
abajo – down 
¿Qué deberiamos hacer? – What should we do?
rápido – fast
mediano – medium
despacio – slow
café – brown
negro – black
blanco – white
rojo – red
rosa – pink
anaranjado – organge
amarillo – yellow
azul – blue
morado – purple
¿Qué sentimiento debemos usar? – What feeling should we use
feliz – happy
triste – sad
enojado – angry
emocionado – excited
tranquilo – quiet/calm
sorprendido – surprised
cansado – tired
como una pregunta – like a question
con una voz fuerte – with a strong voice
con una voz tranquila – with a quiet/calm voice

What other ways are you supporting your child’s language development at home? At school? In the community? Comment below!

Jill is an educator with 3- to 5-year-olds at Hilltop Children’s Center, where she has worked since 2006.  She became the Spanish teacher in 2013.

Hilltop Educator Institute collaborates regularly with change agents across North America, Europe and New Zealand to provide professional development opportunities in Greater Seattle through evening, half-day and full day workshops known as the Educator Discussion Series (EDS).  Hilltop Educator Institute provides resources and support to educators, programs leaders, children’s advocates, and the community at large, in order to widen access and opportunity for all children.  To study at Hilltop for a day, register for upcoming workshops, or learn more about our services, email Mike at institute@hilltopcc.org or visit us at www.hilltopcc.com/institute.